Do You Need to Do Anything Special to Maintain Your Diesel Car?

Car detailing companies always involves improving, waxing and cleaning of a vehicle internally as well as externally to improve it’s resale value. Diesel engines have come a long way since the days when Rudolph Diesel ran his first engine on peanut oil, and although the bare bones of the internal engine design have remained faithful to their original roots, the technology has evolved over the decades to incorporate many precision parts, and external sensors and its fair to say that its these additions which cause the most problems and require the most maintenance. Although a diesel engine block is just as robust as it always was and diesel engines are still capable of a lifetime of well over 300,000 miles with a high level of maintenance, the addition of more delicate components such as precision fuel pumps, turbo chargers, high pressure fuel rails and piezo injectors do require that it is well maintained and serviced on a regular basis.

The diesel engine of the mid to late 90’s was generally used in vehicles which were used on a regular basis, applications such as taxi’s and delivery vehicles covering a high mileage were ideal candidates for the longevity of the diesel engine and often these vehicles would cover well in excess of 400k or 500k miles on the same injectors and turbochargers. During the last ten years the diesel engine has increasingly found its way into general family vehicles thanks to changes in technology making the diesel engine far more refined, quiet and often offering performance close to its petrol driven variants. However, at the same time, diesel engines seem to be suffering from component failures and breakdowns far more frequently and prematurely than their earlier cousins used during the 1990’s.

One reason for this, could be the changes in oil & filter service changes. Back in the 1990’s early diesel engines required servicing on a 4000 – 6000 mile basis, and its fair to say that in return, these same engines often returned close to half a million miles largely using the same engine components as they left the factory with. In comparison, these days, we frequently hear of turbo charger failures on some modern vehicles at as little as 40k – 80k miles, could the oil service intervals play some role in these expensive failures?. I think it is possible, which is why I am writing this article.

Modern diesels have oil service intervals largely dictated by an on on board computer, generally these are referred to as extended oil service intervals, and, depending on driving style can be as far as 12k to 23k miles apart. Even using high specification synthetic oil, I personally believe that these long service intervals (marketed to appease fleet managers of company owned vehicles) are far too far apart for an engine which uses a Turbo Charger. The oil is the lifeblood of any diesel engine, and that same sump oil is used to both cool and lubricate the turbo charger bearings driving a high precision turbine which can spin at up to 150,000 rpm. Of course any small impurities or a drop in lubricating properties can cause wear and overheating of such a delicate part spinning at such a high speed. Upon examining many failed turbo chargers on relatively low mileage vehicles, I have found severe bearing wear leading to eventual failure which I can only attribute to oil quality. I have also seen several turbo chargers which have failed due to oil starvation caused by blockages in the oil feed tube due to sludge build up, which again is a sign of infrequent oil changes and something which rarely occurred in the Turbo diesels of yesteryear which had more regular service intervals.

So my first piece of advice, is that if you drive a Turbo Diesel engined car, that you ignore the service intervals shown on the on board computer and instead start your own service regime changing the engine oil and its filter at no more than 6000 – 7000 mile intervals, always use synthetic oil and make sure that your replacement engine oil is of the grade specified for your vehicle and is approved for use in your vehicle by the vehicle manufacturer. You don’t have to use the actual brand recommended by your vehicle manufacturer, just ensure that the oil which you buy is approved for use in your engine by the vehicle manufacturer. I use a brand called Total Quartz, which is approved for use my own personal vehicle and is very cost effective and is suitable for most cars. Some people may think that changing the oil so frequently is an unnecessary expense, however compared to the cost of replacing a turbo and reducing engine wear, it is actually a common sense bargain.

It is also important to change the air filter and fuel filter every 12k miles, as fuel and air flow is very important to a diesel engine, and some modern diesel can even cut out if the fuel flow is reduced due to a blocked fuel filter. Another weakness on modern diesel cars is the EGR Valve which is fitted to improve exhaust emissions and because it handles engine gases, it can easily become blocked with carbon deposits which cause it to malfunction. Cleaning the EGR is a little fiddly but can often be done by the DIY car mechanic and brake cleaner or Mr Muscle oven cleaner is often a good solvent with which to remove the carbon deposits. The EGR should be checked and cleaned (if required) every 35k miles or immediately if buying a second hand diesel car.

Some cars, such as diesel BMW’s also have a crankcase breather, which is a type of filter which can block and lead to a pressure build up, which in turn can lead to turbo wear and failure, these breathers should also be replaced at around 35k mile intervals. BMW have also recently improved the design of their crankcase breather, so owners of older vehicles should change their original crankcase breathers to the new version ASAP.

One of the biggest problems on newer diesel vehicles, is once again attributed to the ongoing demand for emissions improvement. Since 2008 it has been a legal requirement for European Diesel car manufacturers to include a diesel particulate filter (often called a DPF) on all diesel engined cars, this filter is mounted within the exhaust system and is basically a higher grade version of the catalytic converter, but is designed to trap the soot particles produced during diesel combustion. Basically, a small amount of a special additive is automatically injected into the fuel tank at each fuel fill, this additive helps to trap the soot particles in the DPF filter, thus reducing the vehicle soot emissions, and in the UK generally results in a lower vehicle tax band.

Unfortunately, DPF’s can eventually create a lot of expensive problems for their owners. The DPF’s are programmed by the vehicle computer system to ‘regenerate’ and basically burn off the accumulated soot at predetermined periods as decided by the vehicle on board computer. The regeneration is done by heating the internal honeycomb of the DPF to white hot temperatures which ignite and burn off the filtered soot deposits, essentially cleaning itself. Unfortunately this process can only be done during a fairly long drive, at high rev’s at motorway speeds. If a car fitted with a DPF is rarely used on a motorway, or the DPF regeneration process occurs during a time when the car is only used for short trips then it can fail to complete properly, potentially leading to the DPF becoming clogged or damaged which results in a warning light illuminating, requiring the owner to drive the car on a motorway for a distance just in order to trigger another regeneration attempt. Should the DPF continue to remain blocked, then a DPF replacement is required at a cost of £1000 – £2000. The additive which is injected into the fuel tank is stored in a separate tank or bladder bag, which will also eventually need refilling by a dealer and an ECU reset, usually at 60k – 80k intervals.

Diesel owners wishing to avoid the potential expense of DPF problems and its maintenance would be better choosing a diesel car manufactured before 2008 and which doesn’t have a DPF fitted, and this advice would also extend to those who only travel short distances or do not use motorways on a regular basis. Some car manufacturers such as Saab, BMW, Mercedes and Citroen opted to fit some models of their diesel vehicles with DPF’s before the 2008 deadline and others also included it as a factory option, so if buying a second hand diesel car, it is worth double checking whether a DPF has been fitted, even if it was built before 2008.

So, here is my personal servicing regime for my own diesel car, and this is what I would recommend to any diesel car owner.

6000 – 7000 mile intervals – Change Oil and Filter. Use only synthetic oil approved by the manufacturer and of the specified grade for your local conditions
12000 mile intervals – Change Air and Fuel Filter
35000 mile intervals – Check and Clean EGR Filter and replace Crankcase Breather Filter (if fitted)

Non of the above is especially expensive during the normal course of ownership and is certainly more cost effective than any issues or repairs which could be encountered due to poor levels of maintenance or the vehicle being neglected, so good maintenance pays for itself in the longer term. Costs can often be reduced by doing general servicing yourself, and genuine service parts can often be found at Motor Stores and even on eBay.

(Note to readers:- You may use this article on your own website, blog or forum, provided it is not altered or edited and the above recommended live website links are included)

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Chris_Pointon/22144

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Why Is It So Hard To Find A Good Plumber/Electrician?

Finding a good plumber or emergency electrician Brisbane is a difficult task for home owners.

One, plumbers and electricians possess, or pretend to possess, a skill most of us lack. After all, if we knew how to fix a broken pipe or wire the unfinished bonus room we wouldn’t need a good plumber or an electrician in first place.

Our ignorance not only makes us desperate for their services it also makes us vulnerable to their scams, cons, and thievery-not to mention their plain old shoddy work. To make matters worse, it’s usually an emergency that forces us to call a plumber or an electrician. In our panic for their help, we tend to let our guard down which makes us even more susceptible to their tricks and dirty tactics.

Furthermore, due to the nature of the business, it’s hard to prosecute a bad plumber or electrician. If you’re lucky enough to find them after they’ve swindled you out of your money, the plumber or electrician can usually claim-and do so well within the law-that they did everything you asked them to do; it’s their word against yours. In many cases the home owner is left with no recourse while the plumber or electrician moves onto their next victim.

REFERRAL MADNESS- Finding a good plumber or electrician is difficult but not impossible. You probably already know the first step of process: find a plumber or electrician via word of mouth. Newspapers, phone books, and Web sites can be nothing but lies and exaggerations, but referrals, well, they tell a much more accurate story. Still, they are far from foolproof.

That’s why in order to find yourself a competent plumber or electrician you’re going to have to do more than just get a sound referral from a friend or colleague. You’re going to have to do six other things as well. Those six things are: research, put everything in writing, grow a backbone, be prepared, watch them work, and be careful with your money.

THE RESEARCH IS ON- Once you get a referral from a friend or trusted colleague it’s time to go to work. First and foremost you need proof that the prospective plumber or electrician has insurance, both worker’s compensation and general liability. Don’t just take their word for it, call the insurance company and get a Certificate of Insurance. Getting that certificate is the most important thing you can do in your quest to acquire a good plumber or electrician.

Next, you’re going to want at least a half dozen references and you’re going to call them all. You will also want to know all the professional associations they belong too. Next, take some time to do some internet research. Google the plumber or the electrician’s name to see what you can find. You’ve probably spent hours on the internet researching that $50 MP3 player you use on the treadmill. So why not do the same thorough research on the plumbers and electricians that will be working on your home?

FIRST CONTRACT- Once you’ve finished your homework and selected a plumber or electrician, make sure you both sign a detailed contract. The document should not only outline exactly what you want done but it should also contain ground rules for working in your home (whether or not they can listen to the radio, whether or not they can use your bathroom, stuff like that). Obviously, you’ll have to be flexible if it’s an emergency, but you should still have something in writing.

If the plumber or electrician balks at the idea, or tries to talk you out of signing a contract, then they have done you a big favor. They have just taken themselves out of the running to be your plumber or electrician. Professionals will gladly sign a detailed contract because they know it benefits you just as much as it benefits them.

HANGING TOUGH- You can’t tell it from watching the evening news and seeing the countless horror stories about man’s inhumanity towards man, but most people in the world want to avoid conflict. That’s great when everyone wants to sing “Kumbaya,” but not so great when a plumber or electrician is trying to cheat you out of your hard earned money.

In an effort to gain your business, receive an early payout, or all-together get out of doing the job, some disreputable plumbers and electricians will try to tug on your heart strings. If that doesn’t work some will turn to threats. If they tell you they have a sick child in the hospital or they need their truck repaired don’t believe them. No professional would be that forthcoming with their life’s story. If they make any sort of threat to you or your home, you need to call the cops immediately. If you eventually take the crooks to court you’ll want to show the judge that police report of how they threatened you.

You don’t have to be rude or impolite to a plumber or an electrician, you just have to be tough if they try to pull one over on your. Being tough also helps when it comes to getting exactly what you want. In addition to avoiding conflict we also like to avoid hurting people’s feelings. However, when it comes to plumbing and electrical work feelings be damned. Plumbers and electricians aren’t in business to receive compliments and the warm fuzzies.

OPERATION PREPARATION- Quite often we need a plumber or an electrician because of an emergency. That doesn’t negate the tips we have previous laid out for you, but it does mean you need to be prepared. Have a plumber and an electrician already picked out and ready to call for when something bad (God forbid) does happens. Waiting until a crisis and then hastily selecting a plumber or an electrician is going to increase your chances of getting ripped off and/or getting sloppy work.

WATCH, LOOK, LISTEN- Sure you’re not a plumber or an electrician, but that doesn’t mean you can’t keep an eye on what’s going on. I’m not recommending that you hover over their shoulders but keep tabs on their work, ask questions, and if applicable, take pictures at various stages of the job. Remember that no one, not even the most professional plumber or electrician, cares as much about your house as you do.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE BENJAMINS- Finally, you have to understand the golden rule when it comes to not only hiring a plumber or an electrician, but anyone that works on your home, and that is money controls the job. You’re going to have to pay them at some point, and you may even have to pay some of the money up front, but once you give them all the money you lose all control. Keep this is mind even when dealing with the most venerated plumbers and electricians. Pay in full only when the job is complete and to your satisfaction.

CONCLUSION- If you think I’m trying to turn you into a suspicious, untrusting, paranoid miser I do apologize. That is not my intent. However, we live in a world with unscrupulous people. It would be nice to take strangers at their word, just like it would be nice to leave our cars unlocked at night, but unfortunately we don’t have that luxury. Yes, hiring a good plumber or electrician is difficult and time consuming, but considering they will be working on your biggest investment, your home, a little distrust and paranoia is probably a good thing.

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Brynn_Alexander/748714

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Understanding The Importance of Early Childhood Education

Why Early Childhood Education is Important

Aged care courses Sydney will teach students who have been delayed in stuyding. Most people already know that what they teach their children from a young age will certainly bear an impact on the individuals they will end up being later on. However, most people don’t realize how important it is to start educating their children academically from a young age.

A child who simply gets thrown into the education system without any prior preparation will not only have some catching up to do, he or she will also have motivational problems when it comes to learning.

If you want your children to take a liking to education, to easily progress through the school system while hungering for more knowledge, then you will have to start educating them from a young age. Contrary to what some people believe, early education is about much more than simply giving children a head start once they get into school.

The point of it is to adapt them to the process of learning from a very young age so that they will not only absorb knowledge easier and faster, but they will also feel motivated to do so.

How Should One Handle Early Childhood Education?

Well, unless you are a teacher or have experience educating very small children, you will probably require some assistance on this one. Luckily, there are various resources available to you such as parent support groups and websites that are there to help guide you through the process. However, even knowing how to teach your child is not enough; you need to know what to teach, and when to teach it… this is where early education programs come in.

Indeed, there are many different early education systems and programs that have been designed by experts to give your children a solid base of knowledge.

Naturally, your help and supervision will be required with those systems, but they basically cover what you need to teach and in which order… all you need to do now is find an approach which your child is going to like.

My Recommendation for an Early Childhood Education System

As I’ve always been a bit more old-school, my choice in this situation rests with a time-tested product that only keeps progressing further: Hooked on Phonics.

Some of you may even remember hearing about this brand many years ago, which is not surprising considering that a variety of Hooked on Phonics products have been released over the past couple of decades (since 1987).

When it comes to finding a trustworthy authority in the field of early education, Hooked on Phonics has always proven to be proper choice.